Prompt Nights – When shades of loss weave with pattern of madness [29]

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“To put meaning in one’s life may end in madness, But life without meaning is the torture Of restlessness and vague desire-It is a boat longing for the sea and yet afraid.” –  Edgar Lee Masters

“Too much sanity may be madness and the maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.” –  Miguel de Cervantes

“Nothing is so wretched or foolish as to anticipate misfortunes. What madness is it to be expecting evil before it comes.” – Lucius Annaeus Seneca

“Grief is like the ocean; it comes on waves ebbing and flowing. Sometimes the water is calm, and sometimes it is overwhelming. All we can do is learn to swim.” – Vicki Harrison

“The risk of love is loss, and the price of loss is grief – But the pain of grief is only a shadow when compared with the pain of never risking love.” – Hilary Stanton Zunin

“Believe me, every heart has its secret sorrows, which the world knows not, and oftentimes we call a man cold, when he is only sad.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Hello everyone and welcome to another exciting week at Prompt Nights. I believe that fierce emotion accompanies one who deals with pain, grief and loss; their inner struggle paving the path so as to avoid meeting madness. Nobody ever really knows how much someone else is hurting. We could be standing next to someone who feels broken and we wouldn’t have a clue. Tonight, I want you guys to pen down your deepest thoughts revolving around loss and madness. Feel free to take the subject in whichever direction that you desire. For further inspiration please refer to three amazing poems below:

Acquainted With The Night

by Robert Frost

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain.
I have out-walked the furthest city light.

I have looked down the saddest city lane.
I have passed by the watchman on his beat
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.

I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,

But not to call me back or say good-by;
And further still at an unearthly height,
One luminary clock against the sky

Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right.
I have been one acquainted with the night.

Luke Havergal

by Edward Arlington Robinson

Go to the western gate, Luke Havergal,
There where the vines cling crimson on the wall,
And in the twilight wait for what will come.
The leaves will whisper there of her, and some,
Like flying words, will strike you as they fall;
But go, and if you listen, she will call.
Go to the western gate, Luke Havergal—
Luke Havergal.

No, there is not a dawn in eastern skies
To rift the fiery night that’s in your eyes;
But there, where western glooms are gathering
The dark will end the dark, if anything:
God slays Himself with every leaf that flies,
And hell is more than half of paradise.
No, there is not a dawn in eastern skies—
In eastern skies.

Out of a grave I come to tell you this,
Out of a grave I come to quench the kiss
That flames upon your forehead with a glow
That blinds you to the way that you must go.
Yes, there is yet one way to where she is,
Bitter, but one that faith may never miss.
Out of a grave I come to tell you this—
To tell you this.

There is the western gate, Luke Havergal,
There are the crimson leaves upon the wall,
Go, for the winds are tearing them away,—
Nor think to riddle the dead words they say,
Nor any more to feel them as they fall;
But go, and if you trust her she will call.
There is the western gate, Luke Havergal—
Luke Havergal.

Do Not Go Gentle…

by Dylan Thomas

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

 

So pick up a pen and lets begin! As always the prompt will remain open the entire week so that everyone can write according to their own pace and time. Please click on the blue widget below. When it opens be sure to click on “add your link.” Now skip the blanks and proceed directly to “try here” written at the end in small font. It will direct you on how to link your poem. Please visit other Poets and do comment on their poems. Have fun ❤

7 thoughts on “Prompt Nights – When shades of loss weave with pattern of madness [29]

  1. Magaly Guerrero says:

    Seneca’s quote contains a sort of wisdom we should all carry with us. We need to remember those words in order not to forget to live today, instead of dreading tomorrow.

    Thanks for this prompt, Sanaa. ❤

  2. Ellecee says:

    Again favourite poets of mine appear with their wise council. This will be a challenge for me and one I hope to meet. I enjoy your back-up for our prompts, as always.

  3. gillena says:

    “Believe me, every heart has its secret sorrows, which the world knows not, and oftentimes we call a man cold, when he is only sad.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    Thanks for another lovely Prompt Night Sanaa, the above quote helped to steer me on the writing path this week

    much love…

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