Between Life & Death

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I, a sole connection between two opposite realities; both of which mere mortals defy. There isn’t a single soul upon this earth who hasn’t had an opportunity to tread upon, long after living a fulfilled life ā€” to cross over and tear layers of illusion. But then, that’s what death is now, isn’t it? It’s more like a deception, a myth you could say or a fallacy of sorts. It’s just another name, an excuse for preparing one for the afterlife. I observe as spirits both good and bad cross over, and offer salutation, hoping they come bearing abundance of prayer and faith.

I blinked, as fresh tears welled up and rolled down my cheeks. The mere idea of a beloved not truly dying and just crossing over the bridge between life and death made my heart jump. It gave me hope that perhaps one day we would meet again – meet along lapis skies with a hint of rouge. Each living moment and breathing day, I make sure to offer prayer for their departed souls, so that their sins are forgiven. To give them a fighting chance at heaven.

Rushing tide whispers gently
as sunlight gold beams above
when love eludes dark despair
when orison outplays distress
even nature ebbs with rhythm

 

 

Photo credits:Ā pixabay.com

Posted on Haibun Monday @ dVerse Pub

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Posted for Midweek Motif @ Poets United

46 thoughts on “Between Life & Death

  1. Bjorn Rudberg says:

    The two voices of the bridge and the narrators hope of meeting their beloved on the other side made this very interesting…

  2. Grace says:

    To cross that bridge is never to return again, though I may read that some people do come back after dying for a short time. And I am hopeful that all souls will unite again at some point in time. I offer my prayer and faith too for all departed souls ~ Thanks for linking up Sanaa ~

  3. Xenia says:

    So interesting how you give the bridge a voice here and I do believe we meet again on the other side. Beautifully written Sanaa :o)

  4. Kim M. Russell says:

    Two very interesting perspectives of death, Sanaa, romantic and hopeful.
    I like the voice of the bridge and the idea of crossing over and tearing layers of illusion: the idea of death as a myth. That bridge is god-like, in that it observes ‘spirits both good and bad cross over, and offer salutation, hoping they come bearing abundance of prayer and faith’.
    And then there’s the voice of the living, left behind to mourn but comforted by the words of the bridge, with the poem at the end reminding us of the river beneath the bridge – the river of life?

  5. Marina Sofia says:

    Very appropriate to All Souls Day today 1st November – this meditation on life and death and what lies beyond. Nice contrast between the two perspectives as well. I love that line ‘to give them a fighting chance at heaven’.

  6. debi says:

    “It gave me hope that perhaps one day we would meet again ā€“ meet along lapis skies with a hint of rouge.” I love that, Sanaa, I too hope to meet loved ones again.

  7. Kathy Reed says:

    I wish we knew what lies ahead, if there is a river of forgetfulness we cross over before we begin another life…or are we so entangled in the pattern or matrix ee don’t realize how we travel together.

  8. Susan says:

    ” to cross over and tear layers of illusion ”
    I love this poem, the way it reveals an Eternal Mystery, the way the path itself accompanies and empathizes with those who cross, the way we hope for peace.

  9. gillena says:

    “I make sure to offer prayer for their departed souls, so that their sins are forgiven. To give them a fighting chance at heaven.”

    This is what love requires.
    Truly a stirring write Sanaa

    much love…

  10. marja says:

    Beautiful moving prose about crossing over to the other side
    I love your poem and especially “even nature ebbs with rhythm” which is a perfect closure

  11. Magical Mystical Teacher says:

    “Crossing over” is a lovely metaphor, but I have to confess that I have no idea what will happen when I die.

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